Dating bear archery bows

Dating bear archery bows

This date that is printed on all bows made between and is simply the date of the patent for a working recurve limb and has nothing to do with the actual model year. Nels felt strongly that bows should be individually crafted, and not made by machine.

Then in late it was raised above the surface of the bow. So for you will find Kodiaks with aluminum and bi-directional glass, aluminum with uni-directional glass, and no-aluminum with uni-directional glass.

These bows ordinarily have, what appears to be a hand inscription on one of the limbs that gives a serial amount along with the distance and pull weight of the bow. This serial number works very well for dating Bear Bows from when the first digit of the serial number is the year of manufacture. The Grizzly also began production with the aluminum lamination, but very early in the aluminum was dropped due to the high reported breakage problems of these aluminum bows.

This date that

Upon Nels departure, Fred moved another employee by the name of Bob Meeker over to supervise the manufacturing of the new bow lines. There are many features and changes applied by Bear over the years which will help you in determining your bows model year. Apparently this is because it is thought of as a target bow rather than a hunting bow by collectors. Finally, in August the famous Bear Take-Down recurve went into production. These raised medallions came in both gold and chrome covered plastic and are still used in todays Bear bows.

One item that sticks out are the vintage Bear Recurve Bows. These limbs can be found with both a white overlay in the limb tip, and with a red overlay. Notice the different length of the brush nocks. How To Date Your Fred Bear Bow After we got the bow to our store we noticed that inside the big quiver was a smaller particular quiver. The large Standing Bear decal was used until when it was substituted with silk-screening the identification on the bows.

Nels felt strongly that bows

Collecting Items of the Bear Archery Company

The silk-screening appeared on all bows by the model year. The Patent date which appears on all Bear bows from until is simply the date of the patent for a working recurve limb and has nothing to do with the actual model year. Nels was a fantastic craftsman, and his skills show in each and every one of his bows. In this manner, the archer could mix and match riser styles with various length limbs to allow the bowhunter to pick the bow which best fit his or her desires. This aluminum laminated caused two problems.

Not all Bear bows made in these early years were made by Nels. This is the date of the patent only, and does nothing to date the bow itself. The large Standing Bear decal was used until when it was replaced with the improved methods of silk-screening the identification on the bows. So he came up with a new method of mass producing bows, finally allowing his company to meet this demand. The Kodiak was introduced in with the bi-directional glass and the aluminum lamination.

The Bear Take-Down could be ordered in one of three different limb lengths. However, his private venture into the bow making business lasted only two years before he took a job in an appliance manufacturer as a model maker.

These bows ordinarily have what